Some people have a natural eye for design, but if you're more in the camp of those who can't do anything without consulting Pinterest board upon Pinterest board before making any major changes, we feel you. We'd love to have an interior designer on speed dial before deciding exactly where and how hang to hang that sweet new wall art we bought on a whim. But until we win the lottery, we'll have to settle for trusting our guts, and taking plenty of design tips where we can get them. We've compiled some secrets straight from the pros to help you with all your decorating needs.


I disagree – but have no business doing so because I only have shutters. So I will tell you what I think the biggest problem – and one that I want to change in other people’s homes every time I see it is…….hang your pictures correctly! You know when they are right if standing up you are looking at the CENTER of the picture. And BTW there is no reason you can’t hang a picture below the window casing…..looks great in a bedroom.
In Josh Groban's "The Great Comet" dressing room, interior designer Mike Harrison selected this constellation artwork as a clear focal point for the room. "I loved this piece for its dimensions and colors, but also as a tip of the hat to the 'Comet' influences that I know were of importance to Josh," says Harrison. "I was searching for artwork that would tie together all of Josh's design sensibilities."
Reupholstering your furniture will automatically freshen up an entire space. And if you love eclectic decorating, take notes from this impeccable living room. All the juxtaposition in this room is working so well—the angular mirror, vivid orange photography, marble fireplace, rustic stool, and geometric pottery are all unexpectedly complemented by the softness of the blush pink chairs.
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If Chip and Joanna Gaines have convinced you that your abode needs shiplap, you're usually best off installing the boards horizontally rather than vertically. "It can really expand a space, making it feel larger than vertical boards can," says Jason Arnold. "Horizontal boards also feel more contemporary." Vertical boards, however, can be ideal for rooms with high ceilings.
When renovating a building that already has plenty of character, like this 1920s Spanish Colonial home in Los Angeles, it's all about striking the balance between what you add and what you leave. “We wanted to make it feel more holistic while still honoring its heritage,” designer Steven Johanknecht says of the decision to keep the original hand-carved ceiling beams and wrought-iron chandeliers while removing mismatched materials from previous renovations.
Instead of hanging a painting on a bare wall, accent it with a rich, velvet curtain background. "Curtains just create a great, calming energy in which you feel very shrouded and comforted, making for a luxurious and restful environment," says Framel. "And being able to put a really great pop of artwork in front of that textural colored backdrop has a lot of impact."
With the multihued curtain fabric as her jumping-off point, designer Ashley Whittaker splashed an amped-up version of pink in three places in the living room—the footstool, the contrasting pillow welt, and the slipper-chair trim. "We wanted the home to feel bright and colorful like Florida but not like a vacation home," says Ashley. She pulled off the cozy yet elegant vibe by grounding the sun-and-surf palette with serious touches, such as the antique demilune tables.
Adding a splash of color to any room livens up a space. But before you select a color, consider the function of the room and how the color makes you feel. If you're a morning person, painting your bedroom a bright magenta may help you start the day with energy, but if you can't face the morning without a strong cup of coffee, a soothing shade of blue may be best. Learn more about choosing a color scheme.
I used to have low ceilings. I bought track-style rods that hung from the ceiling and my curtains were on the clips she mentions in the article, making the curtains a couple inches off the ceiling. I also extended the track maybe 4 inches to each side to give the curtains a place to bunch up when I wanted to have a full window view/light. I had two tracks with sheers in back and heavier curtains in front. The extra space on the sides gave a place for all that fabric bulk to go. I may have even extended further… Read more »
Good morning! I took the morning away from the laundry room to work in our Master bedroom. I have the room all cleaned and the bedding is placed on the bed. Still have to place all my decor pieces back into the room, but at least the bed is made. There are a lot of things I can handle in our home, but one of my pet peeves is an unmade bed. It doesn't have to be a beautifully made bed....it just has to be made!! Who is with me?
If Chip and Joanna Gaines have convinced you that your abode needs shiplap, you're usually best off installing the boards horizontally rather than vertically. "It can really expand a space, making it feel larger than vertical boards can," says Jason Arnold. "Horizontal boards also feel more contemporary." Vertical boards, however, can be ideal for rooms with high ceilings.
Looking beyond the traditional with wallcoverings can create a truly standout design presence. "I do think I might have scared [architect Ken Linsteadt] a little bit when I announced I was planning to install two levels of green floral fabric on the walls of the grand salon," says Ken Fulk of his Sonoma Valley lakeside retreat, yet the fabric gives the high walls a richness that wallpaper alone might not have achieved.

Every house should be a warm haven, a place where we throw off the cares of the world and relax with family and friends. From the kitchen where we launch our busy days to the bedrooms where we close our eyes at night and dream, we want each space to reflect our personal tastes and sensibilities. But we desire that our rooms be comfortable and practical. Pulling all the components together is a tall order, and yet it's also wonderfully rewarding. Use the home decorating tips we've provided here as inspiration, and create the kinds of rooms your loved ones will want to hurry home to enjoy.
A stacked fieldstone fireplace takes center stage in this family room. Rather than just a sheer wall of stone, the exposed chimney is designed with a central recess for artwork, along with tapered edges on either side, to keep it from appearing too overpowering. Sconces mounted directly to the stone are an attractive way to shed plenty of light on the antique timber mantel.
I believe we should all love the place we call home and the life we live there. Since 2011, I've been dedicated to making One Good Thing by Jillee a reliable and trustworthy resource for modern homemakers navigating the everyday challenges of running a household. Join me as I share homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make life easier so you can enjoy it more!
I used to have low ceilings. I bought track-style rods that hung from the ceiling and my curtains were on the clips she mentions in the article, making the curtains a couple inches off the ceiling. I also extended the track maybe 4 inches to each side to give the curtains a place to bunch up when I wanted to have a full window view/light. I had two tracks with sheers in back and heavier curtains in front. The extra space on the sides gave a place for all that fabric bulk to go. I may have even extended further… Read more »
The first solution would be to buy a longer set of curtains. Curtains typically come in a few different lengths, so choose the next longer length than your current curtains. You can either let the extra length “pool” on the floor for a flow-y look, or you can hem them to the correct length. (If you’re not much of a seamstress, you could use a fusible bonding material to “hem” them without needing to sew anything.)

If Chip and Joanna Gaines have convinced you that your abode needs shiplap, you're usually best off installing the boards horizontally rather than vertically. "It can really expand a space, making it feel larger than vertical boards can," says Jason Arnold. "Horizontal boards also feel more contemporary." Vertical boards, however, can be ideal for rooms with high ceilings.
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