Absolutely! Huge decorating mistake! Although, I do realize that some people’s living rooms or bedrooms don’t have enough wall space for staple furniture due to their size… :( Nevertheless, for those rooms that do have enough wall space, couches and/or TV’s, entertainment centers etc, should never be placed directly in front of a window, as it looks awful & for the various reasons you stated, infmom.
It sure got my attention when you said that one of the simplest ways to update the look of the room was the use of throw pillows, and seeing the way you used them in one of the pictures, I can agree that you were right. I have been thinking about upgrading the look of the living room for a while now, and I want a collection that I can use for all occasions and seasons. Now I’m thinking that throw pillows will work. I will continue researching, but I will be sure to keep this in mind. Thank you.
We have the best home decorating ideas, do-it-yourself projects, paint-color help, window treatment tips, and small-space solutions for your bedroom, bathroom, and living room. Plus, learn decorating basics with tips from our editors and expert interior designers. Here you'll discover how to decorate small spaces, how to arrange furniture, and how to use decorating accessories.
It’s not as much about where you put your furniture as it is about the types of pieces you choose. "In each room I design, I try to include at least one round piece, such as a coffee table, that people can walk around without bumping their knees," says interior designer Katie Rosenfeld. "I also add a few armchairs and a versatile piece like a garden stool that can be used as a stool to sit on or as a table for a drink."
I understand the reasoning behind this decorating idea, but I have concerns about hanging very long curtains past the bottom window frames in my bedroom. Underneath our window is a heating unit that fits the width of the window (6 to 7 feet) and goes all the way down to the floor. Our home is 90 years old and has radiators, a heat pump, and whatever this thing is. Two other rooms have this heat apparatus in them as well. I don’t want the curtains to cover the heat source of the room, nor do I want them to catch… Read more »
Sure, your eyes may want the most modern, chic couch in the showroom. But your back may not. "In my experience, it's really better to test out seating and take the time to look at the dimensions," says Sharon Blaustein. If you're tall, for instance, you might want to opt for a depth of between 40 to 42 inches for a sofa (rather than the standard depth of 36 inches).
I’m a little late to the party, but I just recently started watching the first season of Queer Eye on Netflix. The ladies of the OGT Team (who I lovingly refer to as “my girls”) have been telling me to watch it for months. But life tends to get in the way, as you know, so I just hadn’t gotten around to it. But I finally sat down and started it, and I’m so glad that I did! I had been warned that Queer Eye would probably make me cry (I’m a notorious crybaby), but I had no idea just how positive and uplifting the show would be as a whole! I’m head-over-heels for the Fab Five, and I feel like I’ve already picked up some useful tips and tricks from them!
Sure, your eyes may want the most modern, chic couch in the showroom. But your back may not. "In my experience, it's really better to test out seating and take the time to look at the dimensions," says Sharon Blaustein. If you're tall, for instance, you might want to opt for a depth of between 40 to 42 inches for a sofa (rather than the standard depth of 36 inches).
So what is this common decor faux pas? It’s when people hang their curtains right at the top of a window frame. Bobby says, “Putting the curtains right at the top of your window makes your window look smaller and your ceiling look shorter.” It’s all about the visual effect your curtains are creating, and no one wants their room to scream small windows and short ceilings, right? Of course not! So what’s the right way to hang your curtains?
It's easy to overlook a room when it's super tiny, especially because there simply isn't enough useable space for décor. But it's definitely possible—and well worth it—to show these nooks some love. Take this powder room, for example. With a light blush pink wall color and a surrounding gallery of eclectic artwork, the small room packs a lot of punch.
Front and back doors open directly into a two-story-high living room, where spruce-planked walls and wood beams salvaged from an 1890 Tennessee barn reflect the home’s rural setting and give the space a refined, barnlike feel. Interior decorator Phoebe Howard balanced the rustic elements with color. “I added an air of elegance with a soft color palette that reflects the surrounding sky and hills,” she says.
I believe we should all love the place we call home and the life we live there. Since 2011, I've been dedicated to making One Good Thing by Jillee a reliable and trustworthy resource for modern homemakers navigating the everyday challenges of running a household. Join me as I share homemaking and lifestyle solutions that make life easier so you can enjoy it more!
Allow your space to continuously change—as your life does. "Remember that your home should always be evolving, just as you are," says Kelly Framel, creative director, stylist and founder of online magazine The Glamourai. "I am constantly picking up new treasures on my travels. Your nest should always be a place of comfort and inspiration, and it's a constant work in progress."

When renovating a building that already has plenty of character, like this 1920s Spanish Colonial home in Los Angeles, it's all about striking the balance between what you add and what you leave. “We wanted to make it feel more holistic while still honoring its heritage,” designer Steven Johanknecht says of the decision to keep the original hand-carved ceiling beams and wrought-iron chandeliers while removing mismatched materials from previous renovations.
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