Speaking of which, the Fab Five’s resident design guru Bobby Berk has a great decor tip that I think is so smart. It addresses what must be one of the most common decor mistakes that people make! And when I talk about “decor mistakes,” I’m not talking about questionable color schemes or about having an odd taste in wall art. I’m talking about those small decor choices that end up having an unintended and negative effect on the room as a whole. These sorts of mistakes are so easy to make, because you may not even know what the issue is in the first place! And the decor mistake I want to talk about today fits that description perfectly.


When renovating a building that already has plenty of character, like this 1920s Spanish Colonial home in Los Angeles, it's all about striking the balance between what you add and what you leave. “We wanted to make it feel more holistic while still honoring its heritage,” designer Steven Johanknecht says of the decision to keep the original hand-carved ceiling beams and wrought-iron chandeliers while removing mismatched materials from previous renovations.
With the multihued curtain fabric as her jumping-off point, designer Ashley Whittaker splashed an amped-up version of pink in three places in the living room—the footstool, the contrasting pillow welt, and the slipper-chair trim. "We wanted the home to feel bright and colorful like Florida but not like a vacation home," says Ashley. She pulled off the cozy yet elegant vibe by grounding the sun-and-surf palette with serious touches, such as the antique demilune tables.
With the multihued curtain fabric as her jumping-off point, designer Ashley Whittaker splashed an amped-up version of pink in three places in the living room—the footstool, the contrasting pillow welt, and the slipper-chair trim. "We wanted the home to feel bright and colorful like Florida but not like a vacation home," says Ashley. She pulled off the cozy yet elegant vibe by grounding the sun-and-surf palette with serious touches, such as the antique demilune tables.

Sure, your eyes may want the most modern, chic couch in the showroom. But your back may not. "In my experience, it's really better to test out seating and take the time to look at the dimensions," says Sharon Blaustein. If you're tall, for instance, you might want to opt for a depth of between 40 to 42 inches for a sofa (rather than the standard depth of 36 inches).


Adding a splash of color to any room livens up a space. But before you select a color, consider the function of the room and how the color makes you feel. If you're a morning person, painting your bedroom a bright magenta may help you start the day with energy, but if you can't face the morning without a strong cup of coffee, a soothing shade of blue may be best. Learn more about choosing a color scheme.
It's easy to overlook a room when it's super tiny, especially because there simply isn't enough useable space for décor. But it's definitely possible—and well worth it—to show these nooks some love. Take this powder room, for example. With a light blush pink wall color and a surrounding gallery of eclectic artwork, the small room packs a lot of punch.
Absolutely! Huge decorating mistake! Although, I do realize that some people’s living rooms or bedrooms don’t have enough wall space for staple furniture due to their size… :( Nevertheless, for those rooms that do have enough wall space, couches and/or TV’s, entertainment centers etc, should never be placed directly in front of a window, as it looks awful & for the various reasons you stated, infmom.

If Chip and Joanna Gaines have convinced you that your abode needs shiplap, you're usually best off installing the boards horizontally rather than vertically. "It can really expand a space, making it feel larger than vertical boards can," says Jason Arnold. "Horizontal boards also feel more contemporary." Vertical boards, however, can be ideal for rooms with high ceilings.
Looking beyond the traditional with wallcoverings can create a truly standout design presence. "I do think I might have scared [architect Ken Linsteadt] a little bit when I announced I was planning to install two levels of green floral fabric on the walls of the grand salon," says Ken Fulk of his Sonoma Valley lakeside retreat, yet the fabric gives the high walls a richness that wallpaper alone might not have achieved.
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